Tag Archives: Facebook

Morning Stories (1-11-2012)

  • From the WSJ, a story on the continued rise of Internet activism in Russia, with interesting stats on financial support protesters have received via the web.
  • Google has unveiled a new search feature, called “Search, plus Your World.” Twitter came out swinging against it, but other reactions have been more positive. Ian Paul at PC World provides some further analysis.
  • Stewart Baker briefly discusses his upcoming testimony against SOPA, slated for January 18.
  • CES also took to the SOPA debate, hosting a panel that included various stakeholders. ars technica provides a good recap.
  • Dara Kerr at cnet reports that Facebook will begin inserting sponsored ads into users’ news feeds. Users can place their mouse over the item to determine whether it is from a friend or a sponsored ad.
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Morning Stories (1-9-2012)

  • Adam Clark Estes at the Atlantic and Adam Thierer at TechLiberation present their takes on Vint Cerf’s NY Times op-ed from last week on Internet as human right.
  • CSIS Has A Set of Critical Questions For 2012. The entire list is worth reading, but I wanted to highlight the technology segment and cybersecurity segment for particular attention, both of which were written by CSIS’s James A. Lewis.
  • Apple’s Siri is a data hog, and highlights looming spectrum crunch facing mobile providers.
  • The Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) asked the FTC to probe Facebook over privacy concerns with the social media giant’s new Timeline feature.
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Morning Stories (12-22-2011)

  • At Technology Liberation Front, Geoffrey Manne and Berin Szoka provide some great perspective on the Google antitrust enforcement letter sent to the FTC by Sens. Kohl and Lee.
  • Mike Masnick at TechDirt dispells the myth that SOPA will only affect foreign websites.
  • Facebook is altering its privacy protections for European users in the wake of an audit by the Irish Data Protection Commission.
  • Digits has a nice review of Woman Innovate Mobile, a new “start-up accelerator” aiming to close the gender gap in the mobile technology market. The application period closes February 1.
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Morning Stories (12-19-2011)

  • The House Judiciary Committee will continue the markup of SOPA on Wednesday at 9:30am, not in January 2012 as originally thought.
  • Tom Daly, President and CTO at Dyn, has a post discussing the technical ramifications of SOPA on the global Domain Name System.
  • CircleID has a story on the ten main Internet Governance developments of 2011. Among them? Arab Spring and Social Media, the Egyptian Internet blackout, and SOPA.
  • FT reports that a “publicity” suit against Facebook will move forward, despite the company’s efforts to have it tossed out of court. The case focuses on “Sponsored Stories,” with plaintiffs (those about whom such stories are made) claiming they’re entitled to some ad revenue from those “unwitting endorsements.”
  • Finally, Tech Europe at WSJ has an interesting report: Internet never used by 24% of the EU population. More at the link.
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Morning Stories (12-14-2011)

  • Foreign Affairs has a good article discussing Russia’s recent parliamentary elections, allegations that authorities interfered with reporting from news sites and blogs, and the role played by social networks like Facebook in providing an outlet for political activism
  • Threat Post discusses the story of an Austrian law student’s request for all of his Facebook data, and the 1222 PDF CD that arrived in response
  • Defence Professionals gives a quick rundown on the US “Blueprint for a Secure Cyber Future;” you can read the full report here
  • The Guardian reports that VOIP companies have gained support of European Ministers, who are calling for regulators to monitor ISPs that engage in blocking or otherwise degrade VOIP services like Skype
  •  OECD countries have issued a call for member states to preserve Internet freedoms, observing that investments in networks and light regulatory efforts are necessary for “promoting economic growth via the Internet.”
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Is Our Children Learning?

This study says in about half of cases, they isn’t, at least not in the first couple of years:

[At 24 institutions of higher learning,] 45 percent of the[] students demonstrate no significant improvement in a range of skills—including critical thinking, complex reasoning, and writing—during their first two years of college.

The publisher quotes US News and World Report as commenting:

The time, money, and effort that’s required to educate college students helps explain why the findings are so shocking …—many students aren’t learning anything.

One report of the study blames the assumption that all information is on the Internet so analysis and study aren’t important:

Sociologists Richard Arum and Josipa Roksa published the book “Academically Adrift: Limited Learning on College Campuses,” which claimed business majors had the least amount of educational gains after their first two years of college….

The study also showed today’s business students are less engaged with the material than in past years. One reason for student disengagement is the Internet — students know they can always look up information when they need it, so they don’t take the time to study and memorize it.

Jonathan Keane of Drexel University writes of “Generation Laz-Y” and quotes another study suggesting that  college students spend 36 percent of their time “communicating and networking across social networks, blogs, personal e-mail and instant messaging.”

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Can the Government Seize Facebook Due to Infringing Profiles?

Trademark owners have argued for some time that Facebook might be liable for trademark infringement by its users, if it fails to act in compliance with the standards discussed in Tiffany v. eBay.

Now Congress is debating with the Obama administration whether seizure of domain names like facebook.com is an appropriate remedy for IP violations.

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