Tag Archives: SOPA

Morning Stories (1-5-2012)

  • Dennis Berman at the Wall Street Journal discusses how algorithms and data analytics continue to shape our world, in ways we might not even expect.
  • Apple is increasing pressure on “app pirates” by sending numerous DMCA notices to Apptrackr, a website that locates cracked apps.
  • The National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Agency (NOAA) has completed its transition to a cloud based email system, as part of a broader government cost savings effort to move appropriate systems to the cloud.
  • Stacey Higginbotham at GigaOM asks some crucial questions about what we want and need our elected officials to understand about technology and the Internet, a “political litmus test for tech.” In addition to Higginbotham’s questions – what do you think is important for our leaders to grasp in this area?
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Morning Stories (1-4-2012)

  • Yesterday there was a great deal of ballyhoo over news that Belarus had passed a law to prevent its citizens from browsing foreign websites. The law is a bit more nuanced than that, but nevertheless concern is warranted. Glyn Moody at TechDirt and Gavin Clarke at The Register give good breakdowns on what we know about the law.
  • John Dunn at CIO discusses Japan’s development of a new “virus cyberweapon” that can be used to back trace attacks and shut down offending systems.
  • Brendan Sasso at The Hill reports that the ACLU is suing a Missouri public library after it blocked websites related to Wicca.
  • Want to know where your representatives in Congress stand on PIPA and SOPA? Check out SOPA Track – you can see whether your lawmakers are actively supporting or opposing the legislation, and how much money they’ve raised from groups in favor of and opposed to the legislation.
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Morning Stories (1-3-2012)

  • Verizon cancels its $2 fee for online or by phone bill payments, a day after it announced it.
  • European hackers plan to take the broader Internet censorship battle to the final frontier with plans for a satellite-based “Internet in space.”
  • Interesting story on the developing trend of “open innovation;” reveals some history about the iPod of which I was unaware.
  • Paul Vixie sets the record straight on the differences between “hop by hop” and “end to end” in DNS security and its relevance to SOPA.
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Morning Stories (12-30-2011)

  • Carl Franzen at TPM gives a rundown of SOPA opponents’ plans to deal with the bill’s supporters, including going after two Republican legislators. If you’re curious about who is undeserving of political support in this next election, consider rewatching the SOPA markup hearing to get some insight.
  • Joe Brockmeier at ReadWriteWeb calls 2011 “the year the free ride died.”
  • Charities are investigating whether contributions they received were the result of the Anonymous STRATFOR hack. They’ve pledged to refund any such money.
  • Finally, a couple stories that aren’t entirely tech related but nonetheless relevant reading:
    • First – Egyptian military forces raided the offices of over a dozen NGOs yesterday, seizing computer equipment and documents. From the article:

The raids, particularly those on American pro-democracy and human-rights organizations, mark a significant deterioration in the relationship between Washington and one of its closest military allies in the Middle East. The U.S. government has supported Egypt’s military since the 1970s, with $1.3 billion in annual funding that now amounts to an estimated 20% of its budget.

    • Second – Vidgar Helgesen writing at ISN heralds 2012 as the beginning of the Age of the Citizen. From the article:

It’s true also that the idea of the free citizen as the source of all political power is age-old. But never has it been applied so directly as in 2011. What happened first in Tunisia and Egypt were called leaderless revolutions, but really what we saw was ordinary citizens taking the lead. 

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Morning Stories (12-29-2011)

  • The CEO of Rackspace, Lanham Napier, writes that SOPA will lead to censorship, and is worse than the problem it purports to solve. Rep. Lamar Smith (R-TX) provided a response.
  • Quinn Norton at ars technica provides a further update on the STRATFOR hack.
  • John Paul Titlow at ReadWriteWeb asks if the world’s next political revolution can be predicted by computers.
  • Meanwhile, cnet’s Declan McCullagh and Business Insider’s Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry provide 2012 predictions. Among them: Google will  jump into the tablet market, Facebook will surprise everyone with more rapid-than-predicted growth, SOPA’s major opponents will undertake significant efforts to thwart the legislation, and aggressive antitrust enforcement will continue.
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Morning Stories (12-27-2011)

  • David Rusenko at Startup Adventures gives a brief anecdote of what the Internet will look like under SOPA.
  • Meanwhile, conservative opposition to SOPA continues to grow, and includes the well-known think tank the Heritage Foundation.
  • Do companies have a property right in the social media accounts of their employees? NY Times reports on the interesting case of Noah Kravitz and PhoneDog.com.
  • Andy Greenberg at Forbes has a story on Telecomix, a group dedicated to exposing those who fight against free speech on the Internet.
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Morning Stories (12-26-2011)

  • STRATFOR, a private intelligence firm, announced over the weekend it had suffered a data breach. Member credit card numbers and massive amounts of emails were accessed. DataBreach.net provides a brief rundown.
  • Public outcry over GoDaddy’s support of SOPA has led the company to change its position on the legislation.
  • Apple has provided its users with a comprehensive guide for which types of purchased media users will be able to “redownload” in their respective countries. The document can be viewed here.
  • Bevil Wooding CircleID discusses the five major tech issues facing emerging markets in 2012.
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